Good enough.

Good enough.

“For some strange reason there is the expectation from those both inside and outside the design profession that compromise is inevitable and, even more regrettably, beneficial in design work. This mistaken and destructive idea could only have originated with those outside of the design profession.”

– Andy Rutledge, Design professional

It was in the 80s with the advent of Desktop Publishing that ‘DIY design’ first seemed to take hold, horrifying graphic designers and leaving typewriters and typesetters behind in the dust. Secretaries liberally created documents using five typefaces on one page, bringing tears to designer’s eyes. The much over-used Comic Sans has since achieved cult status, perhaps the only accolade it could ever achieve.

As software has become both more sophisticated, more accessible and more affordable over the years, there appears to be a growing trend of DIY design in business. Small businesses are producing their own design work, untrained, unchecked, unfiltered and often unprofessional. For them, it’s good enough.

Even though they understand getting your brand right from the start is essential, employing the services of a graphic designer can seem like a prohibitive cost when there’s rent to pay, websites to construct and product to make. Driven by budget, it makes sense to consider more affordable options. There are many online logo design sites offering logo solutions for US$5.00–$50.00, mostly glorified clip art with no original thinking involved. What do you really get for that money? Read this article for the truth. Is that option good enough?

We use different specialists for various tasks in our lives; mechanics for cars, wheel balancers for tyres, truck stops for trucks. Did you ask your web designer to knock you up some magazine ads? Or design you a logo? Many people utilise the wrong skills for a project because it can feel easier once you’ve developed a working relationship with someone to keep using them for everything. The results seem good enough, right?

An important aspect of branding is ensuring all design and communications are consistent, to maintain the client’s image in the marketplace. Far too often there is compromise, mostly when those without understanding override the professional’s vision. Widely referred to as the new advertising, public relations is a specialist area of communications though not design. PR agencies have become a veritable one stop shop. Are they good enough?

Design professional, Andy Rutledge says: “For some strange reason there is the expectation from those both inside and outside the design profession that compromise is inevitable and, even more regrettably, beneficial in design work. This mistaken and destructive idea could only have originated with those outside of the design profession.” For them, it’s good enough.

How important is your brand to you? How important is it to your business? How are you being perceived? Are you happy with your brand, or is it merely good enough?

Consider using a design professional for your brand. Sublime Design are specialists.

Skills

Posted on

August 16, 2017